1956: The Hound of Heaven

The Hound of Heaven 001 [detail]In 1893, English poet Francis Thompson published a poem called “The Hound of Heaven.” The work is an extended metaphor: as a hound pursues a hare in a hunt, so does God pursue the human soul to restore it to grace. The soul may dart and hide, but God’s love is persistent and unwavering.

The American painter Robert Hale Ives Gammell first read Thompson’s poem at the age of sixteen, and it became a lifelong obsession. Following a mental breakdown in the late 1930’s, he began a series of twenty-one paintings inspired by the poem; the sequence was first shown in 1956. In the exhibition catalog, Gammell explained that his paintings do not constitute a literal interpretation:

Eventually I decided that it would involve only a slight change in terminology to consider “The Hound of Heaven” as a history of the experience commonly called emotional breakdown rather than as the story of a specifically religious conversion. The change did not, it seemed to me, traduce the poet’s intention. It suggested, however, a construction capable of conveying the universality of his subject to many persons.

The full text of the poem is here.

The Hound of Heaven - Introductory Plate

The Hound of Heaven 001  The Hound of Heaven 002  The Hound of Heaven 003The Hound of Heaven 004  The Hound of Heaven 005  The Hound of Heaven 006 The Hound of Heaven 007  The Hound of Heaven 008  The Hound of Heaven 009The Hound of Heaven 010  The Hound of Heaven 011  The Hound of Heaven 012The Hound of Heaven 013  The Hound of Heaven 014  The Hound of Heaven 015The Hound of Heaven 016  The Hound of Heaven 017  The Hound of Heaven 018The Hound of Heaven 019  The Hound of Heaven 020  The Hound of Heaven 021

The Hound of Heaven - Concluding Plate

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